Protect Democracy & Expose Western Liberal Democracy

Archive for February, 2012

A Chat Between Christian and Muslim in Lebanon


Indoctrination of Children

Indoctrination of Children

Joey Ayoub wrote in his blog Hummus For Thought! an interesting article titled Endoctrination of Children resenting all kinds of religious schooling and influencing helpless children. He said:

[I was sitting last night with a friend of mine and we got to talk about the whole Christians vs Muslims situation in Lebanon. We were both well placed as I was raised in a Christian environment and him in a Muslim one.

Being both proud members of the Flying Spaghetti Church that preaches keep-your-religion-to-yourself-ism, peace and lots of noodles, we usually end up talking about George Carlin when Jesus and Mohammed were the start of the actual conversation. Yesterday night was different though in that we were actually talking seriously about the issue.

Growing up, I never had the chance to meet many Muslims despite living in the smallest country of continental Asia. The ideas and images that were propagated by my old and very Christian school, Saint Coeur Ain Najm, was not that Muslims did not exist or that Islam was an evil religion – that would be too straightforward – but rather that non-Christian points of views or beliefs were not really worthy of acknowledgment, that somehow we were the lucky ones to have been brought up in the true religion.

I am now 20 years old but I still remember vividly the “Catechese” – sort of Sunday School during the week – sessions that occurred between Chemistry and Biology for an hour or two. We were given some passage from the bible and were basically asked to find a meaning to it. This had nothing to do with whether a meaning was actually present but rather with how any story could eventually fit the narrow interpretation that our teacher had reserved for it. He couldn’t be blamed as he was nothing more than a spokesperson for a much larger and powerful institution. He didn’t really seem to have any opinion of his own anyway. That a soon-to-be atheist was sitting right in front of him couldn’t have entered his worse nightmares.

My friend went to a secular school so he didn’t experience the brainwashing I did and could easily see the flaw in the system long before I could. It didn’t really surprise us that religion played such an important role in Lebanon when it is introduced so early in a person’s life. How long can we pretend that religious-based education does not contribute to the dividing of this already shattered country? What differentiates the indoctrination of helpless children that depend on adults for guidance in an unknown world from the government censorship of opposite views that appalls any man and woman living outside the box? How is telling a child that he or she will suffer the eternal torture of hell by a cruel deity any different from child abuse?

We would probably find it odd if a 4 year old child claims to be part of the Keynesian school of macroeconomics simply because we are pretty sure that economics is too complicated for a 4-year old. Why aren’t we then appalled by a 4 year old wearing a cross? Is the subject of economics more complicated than the questions of life and death? of existence?

Do not get me wrong, I do not really care the religion to which one adheres to but we should draw the line between freedom of thought and belief and imposing one interpretation of the world on helpless and defenseless children. Indoctrination is child abuse and must be regarded as such. Any country that does not put the child’s inalienable rights to education – not brainwashing – as well as, of course, health and safety is bound to end up in the same situation we are in. A child has nothing to do with the bullshit we adults enjoy throwing at each other and must not be a victim of our flaws and weaknesses.

Needless to say, secular schools would not magically solve the problems of Lebanon but they would allow children to identify themselves with different points of views instead of having no choice at all. In a world where corruption is part of the atmosphere a child breathes, one cannot be surprised that corruption is what that child will exhale.

I cannot help myself by quoting Friedrich Nietzsche here to end my first blog post:
“The surest way to corrupt a youth is to instruct him to hold in higher esteem those who think alike than those who think differently.”]


U.S. Constitution no longer model for developing democracies


U.S. Model is Losing in Developing Democracies

U.S. Model is Losing in Developing Democracies

Adam Liptak wrote on The New York Times, on February 6, 2012, the following:

The Constitution has seen better days. Sure, it is the nation’s founding document and sacred text. And it is the oldest written national constitution still in force anywhere in the world. But its influence is waning.

In 1987, on the Constitution’s bicentennial, Time magazine calculated that “of the 170 countries that exist today, more than 160 have written charters modeled directly or indirectly on the U.S. version.”

A quarter-century later, the picture looks very different. “The U.S. Constitution appears to be losing its appeal as a model for constitutional drafters elsewhere,” according to a new study by David S. Law of Washington University in St. Louis and Mila Versteeg of the University of Virginia.

The study, to be published in June in The New York University Law Review, bristles with data. Its authors coded and analyzed the provisions of 729 constitutions adopted by 188 countries from 1946 to 2006, and they considered 237 variables regarding various rights and ways to enforce them.

“Among the world’s democracies,” Professors Law and Versteeg concluded, “constitutional similarity to the United States has clearly gone into free fall. Over the 1960s and 1970s, democratic constitutions as a whole became more similar to the U.S. Constitution, only to reverse course in the 1980s and 1990s.”

“The turn of the twenty-first century, however, saw the beginning of a steep plunge that continues through the most recent years for which we have data, to the point that the constitutions of the world’s democracies are, on average, less similar to the U.S. Constitution now than they were at the end of World War II.”

There are lots of possible reasons. The United States Constitution is terse and old, and it guarantees relatively few rights. The commitment of some members of the Supreme Court to interpreting the Constitution according to its original meaning in the 18th century may send the signal that it is of little current use to, say, a new African nation. And the Constitution’s waning influence may be part of a general decline in American power and prestige.

In an interview, Professor Law identified a central reason for the trend: the availability of newer, sexier and more powerful operating systems in the constitutional marketplace. “Nobody wants to copy Windows 3.1,” he said.

In a television interview during a visit to Egypt last week, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg of the Supreme Court seemed to agree. “I would not look to the United States Constitution if I were drafting a constitution in the year 2012,” she said. She recommended, instead, the South African Constitution, the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms or the European Convention on Human Rights.

The rights guaranteed by the American Constitution are parsimonious by international standards, and they are frozen in amber. As Sanford Levinson wrote in 2006 in “Our Undemocratic Constitution,” “the U.S. Constitution is the most difficult to amend of any constitution currently existing in the world today.” (Yugoslavia used to hold that title, but Yugoslavia did not work out.)

Other nations routinely trade in their constitutions wholesale, replacing them on average every 19 years. By odd coincidence, Thomas Jefferson, in a 1789 letter to James Madison, once said that every constitution “naturally expires at the end of 19 years” because “the earth belongs always to the living generation.” These days, the overlap between the rights guaranteed by the Constitution and those most popular around the world is spotty.

Americans recognize rights not widely protected, including ones to a speedy and public trial, and are outliers in prohibiting government establishment of religion. But the Constitution is out of step with the rest of the world in failing to protect, at least in so many words, a right to travel, the presumption of innocence and entitlement to food, education and health care.

It has its idiosyncrasies. Only 2 percent of the world’s constitutions protect, as the Second Amendment does, a right to bear arms. (Its brothers in arms are Guatemala and Mexico.)

The Constitution’s waning global stature is consistent with the diminished influence of the Supreme Court, which “is losing the central role it once had among courts in modern democracies,” Aharon Barak, then the president of the Supreme Court of Israel, wrote in The Harvard Law Review in 2002.

Many foreign judges say they have become less likely to cite decisions of the United States Supreme Court, in part because of what they consider its parochialism.

“America is in danger, I think, of becoming something of a legal backwater,” Justice Michael Kirby of the High Court of Australia said in a 2001 interview. He said that he looked instead to India, South Africa and New Zealand.

Mr. Barak, for his part, identified a new constitutional superpower: “Canadian law,” he wrote, “serves as a source of inspiration for many countries around the world.” The new study also suggests that the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, adopted in 1982, may now be more influential than its American counterpart.

The Canadian Charter is both more expansive and less absolute. It guarantees equal rights for women and disabled people, allows affirmative action and requires that those arrested be informed of their rights. On the other hand, it balances those rights against “such reasonable limits” as “can be demonstrably justified in a free and democratic society.”

There are, of course, limits to empirical research based on coding and counting, and there is more to a constitution than its words, as Justice Antonin Scalia told the Senate Judiciary Committee in October. “Every banana republic in the world has a bill of rights,” he said.

“The bill of rights of the former evil empire, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, was much better than ours,” he said, adding: “We guarantee freedom of speech and of the press. Big deal. They guaranteed freedom of speech, of the press, of street demonstrations and protests, and anyone who is caught trying to suppress criticism of the government will be called to account. Whoa, that is wonderful stuff!”

“Of course,” Justice Scalia continued, “it’s just words on paper, what our framers would have called a ‘parchment guarantee.’ ”

Source: By Adam Liptak, The New York Times, Published: February 6, 2012

Adam Liptak is the Supreme Court correspondent of The New York Times.
Mr. Liptak, a lawyer, joined The Times’s news staff in 2002 and began covering the Supreme Court in the fall of 2008. He has written a column, “Sidebar,” on developments in the law, since 2007.
Mr. Liptak’s series on ways in which the United States’s legal system differs from those of other developed nations, “American Exception,” was a finalist for the 2009 Pulitzer Prize in explanatory reporting.
In 2005, Mr. Liptak examined the rise in life sentences in the United States in a three-part series. The next year, he and two colleagues studied connections between contributions to the campaigns of justices on the Ohio Supreme Court and those justices’ voting records. He was a member of the teams that examined the reporting of Jayson Blair and Judith Miller at The Times.

U.S. Mass Incarceration of Black Men


Racial disparity between US and incarcerated populations

Racial disparity between US and incarcerated populations

According to the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics, non-Hispanic blacks comprised 39.4 percent of the total prison and jail population in 2009, with an imprisonment rate that was six times higher than white males and almost three times higher than Hispanic males.

Journalist Lisa Ling has covered a range of topics on her documentary series “Our America,” which were aired in November 2011. In an episode titled “Incarceration Generation,” Ling explored the disproportionate number of black men behind bars and the challenges they face after being released. The show also discussed the effect imprisonment has had on multiple generations, creating a cycle of poverty in the African American community.

Ling spoke about her work with the OWN network (The Oprah Winfrey Network) series that is now in its second season, a venture she took on after doing investigative work for the National Geographic Channel and a three year stint on ABC’s “The View.”

“It has certainly been the most gratifying work experience I’ve ever had,” she said, according to Eurweb.com. “I can’t tell you how many times throughout the course of shooting this series, that I felt like I was in a foreign place or a distant place. But the reality is that all of these stories, in their greatest complexity, are in our backyards.”

Statistics show that an incarcerated man is not foreign within the black community. According to the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics, non-Hispanic blacks comprised 39.4 percent of the total prison and jail population in 2009, with an imprisonment rate that was six times higher than white males and almost three times higher than Hispanic males.

That number goes beyond prison doors and into homes. A Bureau of Justice Statistics special report found that over 1.7 million children had a parent in prison in 2008, usually a father. Of those fathers, four in 10 in state or federal prisons were black. Studies have found that children of incarcerated parents face unique difficulties including increased chances of homelessness, agressive behavior, failure in school and future imprisonment.

In addition, ex-offenders are far less likely to find a job upon their release from prison, crippled not only by their criminal record, but oftentimes, additionally hindered by their lack of experience and education. According to a 2003 report by the New York University Urban Institute Reentry Roundtable, about 70 percent of offenders and ex-offenders are high school dropouts.

Source: BLACK VOICES

[Lisa J. Ling (born 1973) is an American journalist, best known for her role as a co-host of ABC’s The View (from 1999–2002), host of National Geographic Explorer, reporter on Channel One News, and special correspondent for the Oprah Winfrey Show and CNN. She is the older sister of journalist Laura Ling.]

U.S. Prison System: Largest in the World

The U.S. prison system is the largest in the world, not only in terms of overall number of inmates, but as a percentage of the total population as well.  With over 2.3 million people behind bars, U.S. prisoners represent almost 25% of the world’s total prison population (the U.S. population is 5% of the world).  The only country that comes close is Russia, with South Africa a distant third.

The U.S. has the highest rate of jail in the world

The U.S. has the highest rate of jail in the world

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US Debt in Graphs and Charts


Political Party Responsibility in US Debt 1901-2009

Political Party Responsibility in US Debt 1901-2009

Composition of U.S. Long-Term Treasury Debt 2005-2010

Composition of U.S. Long-Term Treasury Debt 2005-2010

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Crazy Wrong Side of Civilisations


Civilised I doubt it

Civilised? I doubt it!

Yes I agree with the French interior minister Claude Guéant statement few days ago that “all civilisations are not equal”, although I didn’t want to be put bluntly the way he did it. I add to that an advice: you minister are standing arrogantly on the wrong side of civilisations.

Do you really read the news?

Let me remind you here of few headlines of today only:

Whitney Houston died at the age of 48. (Very shortly after Michael Jackson,

Al-Qaeda commander encourage jihadist to join the western fight against the Syrian President.

Greeks fiercely struggling to oppose the EU and IMF bailout conditions to avoid bankruptcy.

Jihadists are flocking to Syria from neighboring Iraq and weaponry is being sent across

The leader of Al-Qaeda has voiced his support for the Syrian uprising.

John F. Kennedy Assassination Anniversary Sparks Theories 48 Years On.

Hunt warns over football racism.

Turkey bombs Kurdish militant hideouts in Iraq.

Arabs ministers meet over Syria after U.N. veto

Public ‘wants press regulation’ BBC

David Cameron plans Number 10 summit to tackle football racism

Coup in Maldives? Tourists relax amid political fray

Al-Qa’ida chief urges outside help for Syria rebels

Murdoch to jet in for crisis talks over Sun arrests

Australia lines up with US for war with China

The leader of al-Qaida: Muslims should support Syrian uprising

20 Celebrities Who Died Before Age 35

AIPAC to Obama: Attack Iran or let Israel do it

Is Greece in Europe just like another Mexico to the USA?

Europe’s black cygnets

Report: US Officials Say Israel Backing ‘Terrorists’

Lieberman: We’re Prepared to Deal with Hizbullah

Clash of Civilizations Enters French Presidential Contest

 

These are just incomplete one day harvest Mr. “civilized”!

Rigging the Rules: unfair land deals in South Sudan


unfair land deals in South Sudan

unfair land deals in South Sudan

Nickolas Johnson of the Oakland Institute (OI) wrote on Feb 9, 2012, at Pambazuka-news Issue #569 the following:

[According to a recent report by the Oakland Institute, ‘Understanding Land Investment Deals in Africa: South Sudan’, a large influx of one-sided foreign investment has flooded into South Sudan. These unfair land deals undermine the land rights of rural communities, increase food insecurity, further entrench poverty, and might result in skewed development patterns in South Sudan. One case studied by the report involves an Egyptian equity firm, Citadel Capital.

Foreign investors have increased investment in South Sudan since 2005 and the ability to obtain one-sided agreements through local power brokers has caused conflicts. Just from 2007 to the end of 2010, private interests sought or secured more than eight percent of South Sudan’s total land area. In order to ease growing tensions, in September 2011, President Salva Kiir Mayardit promised to review lease agreements signed during the interim period as well as to pass new procurement legislation to regulate future land deals.

In 2009, Citadel Capital obtained a 25-year lease to 105,000 ha of land in Gwit and Pariang counties of Unity State in South Sudan through a portfolio company, Concord Agriculture. Concord estimates that there are about five villages in the project area with a total population of approximately 1,250 people, not including Fellata pastoralists from across the border in Sudan who pass through the area on a seasonal basis. Concord reports that the purpose of the investment is to grow maize and sorghum for sale in primarily local markets.

GROUND REALITY
Although Concord’s leasehold is entirely on community-owned land, the company signed its lease agreement directly with the state government with no lease payments for the community landowners or any other form of direct community benefit. Additionally, Concord has disregarded community requests for employment opportunities, preferring to outsource labour from other countries in Africa.
Furthermore, the 2009 Land Act requires for the first time that companies must conduct environmental and social impact assessments (ESIAs) prior to land allocation. When asked if Concord had conducted ESIAs, the Unity State governor asserted that the company had brought in an expert from the World Bank to conduct the studies. According to CEO of Concord Agriculture, Peter Schuurs, however, Concord did not conduct any assessment of likely impacts. ‘Since the funders were funding the start-up out of their own pocket, there was no need for a detailed ESIA, nor did the government or the agreement require it,’ Schuurs reasoned.
Disregarding the need for impact assessments and mitigation plan can sharply increase the risk of negative impacts on host communities.

ONE-SIDED INVESTMENT
In a conversation with the Oakland Institute researchers, Schuurs stated that the agreement ‘is strongly tilted in favour of the lessee.’ He cited that Concord is exempt from taxes on machinery, agricultural imports, and profits for the first 10 years. Concord is also permitted unlimited capital repatriation.
Although Concord asserts that it will prioritize sale of its produce in local markets in the short to medium term, its clear priority is to make money. With no export restrictions within the investment agreement, Concord is free to export as much as they would like even in times of increased food insecurity in the country. Also as reported to the Oakland Institute, the company is hoping to secure a contract for feeding the South Sudan Liberation Army.
To achieve food security, Schuurs and Unity Governor, Taban Deng, believe that large-scale industrial agriculture projects (such as that of Concord) are the answer, as opposed to smallholder farming and pastoralism in Unity State. This skepticism is due to the widely held misconception that pastoralists are solely concerned with their cattle. While agriculture is not as central to pastoralist communities as with agriculturalist communities, family farms that pastoralist communities maintain with their cattle are crucial to local food security.
Schuurs maintains that Concord will take further steps in being a responsible investor, but acknowledges that any steps taken are not binding: ‘I don’t want us to be seen as money grabbing, land grabbing thieves. But none of [these obligations are] in the investment agreement.’ This has created an agreement void of any formal community benefit and has left the possibility of future steps to be taken only through informal discussions with the Unity State government.

CARTE BLANCHE TREATMENT
Because Citadel has funded the Concord project without outside investment, it intends to scale down its interest in the company over time. According to Deng, Citadel has explored having the Bank of South Sudan (BoSS) provide a guaranty for Concord to pursue a loan or outside investors to compensate for the loss of the capital from Citadel. If Concord were to default on a loan guaranteed by the BoSS, then the government would be required to pay back the loan for Citadel. For a project that has yet to prove itself economically viable, it is shocking to see how far the government is willing to go in order to facilitate foreign investment in South Sudan.

UNFULFILLED PROMISES
Both Schuurs and Deng claim that Concord maintains a good relationship with the local community. The locals however complain about lack of employment opportunities and Concord’s preference for migrant labourers from Southern Africa. According to Schuurs, the company employs 15 to 20 local people as casual laborers and nine permanent staff.
In addition to employment, Concord claims to provide numerous social services including a health clinic, horticultural training, and technology transfers. The residents, however, reported to the Oakland Institute that the health clinic is not functional and with a largely absent nurse. Locals further report that agricultural training, although promised, has not yet been implemented by Concord.]

BROUGHT TO YOU BY PAMBAZUKA NEWS.

About the author: Nickolas Johnson is an Intern Scholar at the Oakland Institute (OI) majoring in Political Science at San Francisco State University. This backgrounder on Concord Agriculture in South Sudan is based on OI’s project, Understanding Land Investment Deals in Africa: Country Report South Sudan. Download the full report publication from this link.

Oakland Institute is an independent policy think tank in Canada, bringing fresh ideas and bold action to the most pressing social, economic, and environmental issues of our time. Their mission is to increase public participation and promote fair debate on critical social, economic and environmental issues in both national and international forums.

About the publisher: PAMBAZUKA News is produced and published by FAHAMU – Networks For Social Justice.

Pambazuka’ in Kiswahili means the dawn or to arise as a verb.
Pambazuka News is produced by a pan-African community of some 2,600 citizens and organisations – academics, policy makers, social activists, women’s organisations, civil society organisations, writers, artists, poets, bloggers, and commentators who together produce insightful, sharp and thoughtful analyses and make it one of the largest and most innovative and influential web forums for social justice in Africa.

The original article is at: http://pambazuka.org/en/category/features/79816.

Greece and Exiting European Hotel California


Greece Withdrawal from European Hotel California

Greece Withdrawal from European Hotel California

Hotel California the lovely top hit song from the Eagles’ album of the same name that they released as a single in February 1977. The last line sounds to be fitting to the European Union.

The lyrics describe an establishment as a luxury resort where “you can check out anytime you like, but you can never leave.” On the surface, it tells the tale of a weary traveler who becomes trapped in a nightmarish luxury hotel that at first appears inviting and tempting. The song is an allegory about hedonism, self-destruction, and greed of the late 1970s. The abstract nature of the lyrics has led listeners to their own interpretations over the years.

Enjoy the lyrics first; then proceed to the grim question of could a Member State Leave the European Union and/or Euro-zone ?

Hotel California

On a dark desert highway, cool wind in my hair
Warm smell of colitas, rising up through the air
Up ahead in the distance, I saw a shimmering light
My head grew heavy and my sight grew dim
I had to stop for the night
There she stood in the doorway;
I heard the mission bell
And I was thinking to myself,
This could be heaven or this could be hell
Then she lit up a candle and she showed me the way
There were voices down the corridor,
I thought I heard them say…

Welcome to the hotel California
Such a lovely place
Such a lovely face
Plenty of room at the hotel California
Any time of year, you can find it here

Her mind is tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends
She got a lot of pretty, pretty boys, that she calls friends
How they dance in the courtyard, sweet summer sweat.
Some dance to remember, some dance to forget

So I called up the captain,
Please bring me my wine
He said, we haven’t had that spirit here since nineteen sixty-nine
And still those voices are calling from far away,
Wake you up in the middle of the night
Just to hear them say…

Welcome to the hotel California
Such a lovely place
Such a lovely face
They living it up at the hotel California
What a nice surprise, bring your alibis

Mirrors on the ceiling,
The pink champagne on ice
And she said we are all just prisoners here, of our own device
And in the master’s chambers,
They gathered for the feast
The stab it with their steely knives,
But they just can’t kill the beast

Last thing I remember, I was
Running for the door
I had to find the passage back
To the place I was before
Relax, said the night man,
We are programmed to receive.
You can check out any time you like,
But you can never leave!

Rights of withdrawal from the European Union; Does a right of withdrawal exist?

The treaties were concluded “for an unlimited period”
● Article 53, TEU
● Article 356, TFEU
Accordingly, there is no right to withdraw from the EU unless such a right can be inferred or implied from treaty itself (Article 56, Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties. However, Article 50 TEU (inserted by Lisbon) now allows a Member State to withdraw from the EU in accordance with its own constitutional requirements.

Provisions dealing with negotiation of withdrawal do not specifically deal with a Member State also departing from Eurozone. So there is a mechanism for withdrawal which comprises both EU and Eurozone membership under Article 50. This is followed by immediate re-application solely for EU membership under Article 49.

Rights of Withdrawal from the Eurozone

The Treaties do not create an express right of withdrawal from Eurozone. No right of withdrawal can be implied since inconsistent with Article 140(3), TFEU (which refers to the irrevocable fixing of the euro substitution rate for the acceding currency)

There is therefore no procedure available under which Member State can leave Eurozone but remain within EU. In strictly legal terms, such an outcome could only be achieved by a revision of the Treaties.

Both Member State in difficulties and all other Member States may agree that Eurozone departure would be in best interests of all. What legal avenues are open to them? Amendment/ratification of Treaties would be very time- consuming and would not answer a pressing urgency.

Suspension of treaty is allowed for a period, but merely gives time and does not affect overall legal position among the parties (Articles 60 and 72, Vienna Convention). There is therefore no treaty or legally-based mechanism allowing for a Eurozone (as opposed to an EU) exit on an urgent basis.

There is no easy way out of the Eurozone – voluntarily or compulsorily. This is to be expected given the inter-connected nature of the currency and of the European financial markets.

A Eurozone departure is not necessarily a remedy for the fiscal ills of the departing Member State and (unless a “position of strength” departure) is likely to increase its debt servicing costs, given that many external creditors will remain entitled to claim payment in Euro. Local creditors in the departing Member State itself and holders of domestic law obligations are the most likely to be disadvantaged by the withdrawal.

Assaults on Remaining Old Decency in Europe


Assaults on Remaining Old Decency in Europe

Assaults on Remaining Old Decency in Europe

The troubles of Greece, Ireland, Portugal, Spain and Italy are they really about debts and fiscal discipline? I guess not. Greece always remained the bastion of good national values and strong culture of decency. These values and principles are under assaults from the governments of big new Europa. Sovereign debts and bankruptcy are just few weapons in their arsenal for swallowing the remaining pockets of good old Europe.

Poland and few other countries, while not yet in direct firing, are very well aware of that and watching the grave developments anxiously and cautiously; and asking themselves who is next in the hit list.

The relationship between Germany and France despite being well-coordinated for now is very far from reliable and lasting. The third engine of new Europa, Britain, is discovering that its interests and relationship with France and Germany are at risk from power shifting and the EU assumption that the UK is in the periphery of Europa. The government of France is very content with role of assistant or deputy in the EU helm. Britain is definitely not.

Greece, Ireland, Portugal, Spain and Italy cannot sustain for long time the new pattern of interference, EU-appointed bureaucrat; and erosion of real democracy. The financiers’ and political conflicts in the EU are making bad economies even worse.

Will Greece, and other potential candidates, be allowed to pull out of the EU? The answer now is definitely NO; because even if Greece is not willing to accept the bailout with the attached conditions, the EU is still want to take Greece. New Europe cannot live with pain in the ***.

Reinvent Democracy by creating 3D Democracy!


Welcome to 3D Democracy blog!

Reinvent Democracy by creating 3D Democracy

Reinvent Democracy by creating 3D Democracy

I started this personal WordPress.com blog in mid September 2011 and named it Tarig Anter with the purpose of posting articles, news and opinions about “Protecting Democracy & Exposing Western Liberal Democracy”.

I found it more helpful to create another blog and name it 3D Democracy. The name and the address of this new blog is more public and easier to remember. While Tarig Anter is a personal blog, the new 3D Democracy blog is for everybody to own, share and contribute. Therefore, that new blog is completely yours; and I shall be just a single contributor in the discussions, writing and the actions that intended to serve and develop the purpose of inventing new just democracy.

The main theme there, in the new blog, is about reinventing democracy in the world with particular emphasis on my continent, Africa, and the developing countries.

Reinvent Democracy by Creating Three Dimensional 3D Democracy is about  advocating

1- The Right of All Citizens to Elect at Least Three Representatives in Their Parliaments To Protect Their Distinct Social, Economic and Political Interests.

2- Parliament Must Be Equally Shared By Men and Women.

3- The Powers of Trade & Business Unions and Ethnic Communities Must Be Increased to Level With Political Parties.

All articles and comments that were posted here are exported to 3D Democracy blog. So, Please browse and comment and keep visiting that blog.

That new blog is your baby! so nourish it and keep it growing.

Best regards.

Tarig

More Than One Assassin Killed J.F.Kennedy


Who Killed JFK

Who Killed JFK?

JFK One Killer Is Just Impossible

JFK One Killer Is Just Impossible

Did Oswald really pull the trigger that killed Kennedy

Did Oswald really pull the trigger that killed Kennedy?

It is really amazing why the authorities in the US and particularly the administration of L. Johnson are not convinced that more than one assassin were involved in the killing of JFK.

America and the world need a definite answer about who really killed the two Kennedys; and if any US government agencies were behind these heinous crimes?

For more details see also the reports of Jim Garrison, the District Attorney of New Orleans. On Kennedy assassination investigation please see JFK, a 1991 American film directed by Oliver Stone. It examines the events leading to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, through the eyes of former New Orleans district attorney Jim Garrison (played by Kevin Costner); and how his office was blocked from successful prosecution by a federal government cover-up defending the two official investigations: the Warren Commission, and the House Select Committee on Assassinations.

Who Killed John F. Kennedy? Remain an unanswered question.

This is the least the American people can do to honor their principles and let the Kennedys rest in peace.

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