Protect Democracy & Expose Western Liberal Democracy


The chronic conflicts in the Sudan are results of the occupation of the earlier Fulani, who are the administrations of Al-Jaalieen, Bani Aamer, Kordofan, and Fur; together with the new Fulani, who are the Umma Party and the Baggara groups. The occupation began by those brought by Muhammad Ali in 1820 in coordination with the regime of Othman Dan Fodio in Nigeria. The current uprising is about resisting and trying to gain freedom from the new and earlier Fulani and West African groups. No need for fake analysis.

There is no difference at all between the ruling militias and the civilian clique since the so-called “Independence” in 1956. The only exception was a single general (Gafar Nimeiri) who was President of Sudan (1969–1985) and he was fiercely opposed and deposed by west and North African settlers.

In 1820 Muhammad Ali the Turkic colonizer of Egypt sought help from the family of Othman Dan Fodio (1754r) – 1817), the founder of the Fulani Sokoto Caliphate (1804–1903) in north Nigeria, to provide mercenaries and slaves to create a colony in what is called “the Sudan” today. The name “the Sudan” appeared in 1820 to refer to the new colony of Muhammad Ali. “Sudan” was a name first given by Turkic-Berber bandits who colonized Spain and Portugal and were expelled in 1492 by the Reconquista. Sudan meant sub-Saharan West Africa slaves and region. It means “blacks” in Amorite Levant Arabic dialect.

The new colony of Muhammad Ali was coercion of three independent friendly neighboring regions separated by the White, Blue and Nile Rivers. Slavery and looting were the functions of the Sudanese groups and their masters from North African Berber, Levant Amorites and Turkic Mongolians invaders.

Since 1820 power and wealth in the colony of the Sudan are monopolized in the hands a mixed foreign minority. In 1881, the Sudanese colonizers responded to the international imposition of ban on slavery by waging bloody raids, claiming to be against their Turkic-Amorite-Berber partners on religious grounds. They killed and beheaded the Scottish General Charles George Gordon then in the following two days in 26-27 January 1885 massacred 24,000 and enslaved many more in Khartoum only.

The Mahdist regime (1885–1899) killed, displaced, enslaved and brutally looted the entire colony and caused famines and endemics. The Mahdist era became known as the “period of chaos and anarchy”.

In Darfur, rebellions against Mahdist regime broke out because it forced Darfurians to migrate north to defend the regime, while favoring the Baggara bandits over other Darfurian in regards to government positions. The opposition to the Mahdist regime was also fueled by many Mahdists violent and abusive crimes towards locals. Several states bordering the Mahdist colony to the west began to provide settlers and mercenaries. Faced with a growing number of rebels, the Mahdist rule in Darfur gradually collapsed.

The Mahdist regime was actually a plan made and directed by Evelyn Baring “1st Earl of Cromer”, with his banking partners to turn the colony of Sudan from Turkic hands into British-Jewish control. The Sudanese were serving the British-Jewish side after they realized that the ruling Khedive is bankrupt and weak.

In 1899, after massive Mahdist failures to provide revenues, the British-Jewish decided to make presence in the Sudan colony by the re-conquest of Sudan and forging a regime called “Condominium”. The Mahdist ruler tried to resist, assuming it was his personal colony, but most of the Sudanese from West Africa were on the side of the invading British forces. They defeated him and the Sudanese remained partners. The Condominium rewarded the Sudanese by empowering them and handing over the colony to them in 1956 when the British-Jewish colonizers found that indirect rule is more profitable

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