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Posts tagged ‘Horse’

The Hyksos Did Not Bring or Introduce Chariots to Egypt


Important Update Notice on 24 July 2018: I have updated my Abyssinian Hypothesis  after discovering the that single-hump camel (The dromedary) was unknown in Arabia, Aram, Assyria, and Kemet before 950 BC, while in abundance in the land of Punt.

This led to make the following major changes:
1- The proposed origin of Israelite from being Arabic-speaking Arab Yemenis to Ge’ez-speaking African Puntite;
2- Rename the Abyssinian Hypothesis to the Ge’ez Puntite Hypothesis;
3- The Turkic Mongolian colonizers and rulers of Neo-Babylonia invited elders from the House of Israel to Babylonia in around 580 BC in what is called the Babylonian Exile to help the create Judaism and colonize Aramaic land in 530 BC;
4- The Hebrew Language and the Hebrew Israelite are products of admixture between Ge’ez Israelite, Turkic Mongolian Persians, and colonized Aramaic. They existed only after 530 C; and
5- The Lost Sheep of the House of Israel are those Israelite who  left the land of Punt and decided to collaborate with Turkic Mongolians to invent Judaism and colonize Aramaic lands; and turned into Hebrew Israelite.

Therefore, the Israelite Exodus of 1446 BC was only within Punt, from one region to another. The Jews are not Israelite at all; and the name Judah was just used deceptively to relate the Jews to the Israelite. The Israelite were scattered all over the world and they no longer exist as a nation or a tribe.

For more details on the Ge’ez Puntite Hypothesis read the following three articles:
1- How Persians Cooked a Cult and Called it Judaism Part 1
2- The Turkic Mongolian-African Israelite Joint-ventures
3- Jesus Pointing to “The Lost Sheep of the house of Israel” and “the Gentiles”
[End of notice]

Ancient Egyptians (Kemets) mastered mathematics as it was essential for their very advanced knowledge in building construction, astronomy, agriculture, administration, and technologies.

Ancient Egyptian mathematics  is the mathematics that was developed and used in Ancient Egypt c. 3000 to c. 300 BC, from the Old Kingdom of Egypt until roughly the beginning of Hellenistic Egypt. The ancient Egyptians utilized a numeral system for counting and solving written mathematical problems, often involving multiplication and fractions. Evidence for Egyptian mathematics is limited to a scarce amount of surviving sources written on papyri. From these texts it is known that ancient Egyptians understood concepts of geometry, such as determining the surface area and volume of three-dimensional shapes useful for architectural engineering, and algebra, such as the false position method and quadratic equations.

Evidence indicates that Egyptians made use of potter’s wheels in the manufacturing of pottery from as early as the 4th Dynasty (2600 BC). It is certain that Egyptians invented and used carts driven by ox and donkey. After the Egyptians were invaded by barbaric nomadic Hyksos riding horse-back, Egyptians invented light single-horse chariots and used them for war.

The Hyksos were Turkic Mongolians with their slaves and mercenaries from defeated nations (mainly Iranian Kurds as foot soldiers, mercenaries, and concubines). Only with the invention of the light chariot with spoked wheels did the horse take on military significance. And that is exactly what the Egyptians did and used to defeat the horse-riding Hyksos.

The claims of Alfred S. Bradfrod that the Hyksos introduced to Egyptians chariot are baseless. [Around 1700 BCE an outside nation, known as the Hyksos, invaded Egypt and slowly took control both militarily and politically. The Hyksos people introduced to Egyptians the horse, chariot and modern Bronze Age weapons.  The chariot developed around 2000 BCE, and the Indo-Iranians were the first to use a chariot similar to those of the Hyksos—“light, two wheeled and spoked.”]  With Arrow, Sword and Spear: A History of Warfare in the Ancient World (Westport, Connecticut: Praeger Publishers, 2001), page 13.

The Chariot:  A Weapon that Revolutionized Egyptian Warfare, by Richard Carney, says: [Around 1700 BCE an outside nation, known as the Hyksos, invaded Egypt and slowly took control both militarily and politically. The Hyksos people introduced to Egyptians the horse, chariot and modern Bronze Age weapons. ] While admitting that Egypt is one of the oldest civilizations in the world, it is illogical that scientists and historians could write that the Hyksos brought or introduced chariots to Egypt. (Read: The Chariot).

The main points here are: 1. The Hyksos didn’t introduce the chariot to Egypt; 2. Using chariot in war was invented by Egyptians; and 3. Peaceful usage of carts, coaches, and wagons were known much earlier both in Central Asia, China, India, Mesopotamia, Egypt, and elsewhere.

The History of Central Asia: The Age of the Steppe Warriors. (I.B. Tauris & Co Ltd, October 2012) a book by Christoph Baumer is helpful in relating different vehicles to different regions and usages.

 

Linking Horses, Trojan War, Bronze Age Collapse, with Turkic Raids


The earliest depiction of the Trojan Horse, from Mykonos vase 670 BC

The earliest depiction of the Trojan Horse, from Mykonos vase 670 BC

The limited information available on the great collapse of the Bronze Age around 1177 BC provides some important clues to reconstruct the history. First of these clues is the appearance of horses and its role in the Trojan War. Nomadic Turkic Mongolian raiders from Eastern Asia were the first to domesticate horses and it became their fatal weapon of invasion and war during the Bronze Age.

Horses became increasingly powerful components of Eurasia only from the middle of the second millennium BC. The Medes and Persians were especially rich in horses (Sanh. 98b). In Jewish times after the Hebrew Israelite era the horse seems to have become common in Canaan. The Turkic Jews brought with them horses from Babylon (Neh. vii. 68); and there was a “horse gate” in Jerusalem (II Chron. xxiii. 15). In connection with Zech. i. 8 the Talmud distinguishes red, yellow, and white horses (Sanh. 93a). Chariots were first introduced as a weapon in Egypt by the Hyksos (about 1700-1550 BC). Egyptians did not ride on horses but used them for chariots. Two horses are the rule. Horseshoes were not used.

Another interesting and very important observation which is also a helpful clue is the similarity between the distributions of horses and domestication history in Asia, Europe and around the world with maps of Turkic raids and colonies. The US has the highest total number of horses. In Europe Russia has most horses, followed by Romania, Ukraine, Germany, France, and then The UK. Others with more than a million horse include: China; Mexico; Brazil; Argentina; Columbia; Mongolia; Ethiopia; and Kazakhstan. According to FAOSTAT (2005), there are 9.1 horses per 1000 persons in the world. The figure is highest for Latin America and Caribbean with 46.4 horses per 1000 persons followed by South America with 41, North America with 28.7, Oceania 11.1, Europe 8.9, Africa 4.6 and Asia 3.7.

The discovery of iron and the invention of long sword brought additional weapon which caused the horrible wide spread collapses of many civilizations all around the Mediterranean. The resulting spectacular destruction created waves of the Sea People from masses of refugees and invaders.

Troy’s ancient name was Ilion or Wilion. Ancient Greek historians variously placed the Trojan War in the 12th, 13th, or 14th centuries BC: Eratosthenes to 1184 BC, Herodotus to 1250 BC, and Duris of Samos to 1334 BC. An article on National Geographic Society says: “On April 24, 1184 BCE, the city of Troy fell to invading Greek armies, ending the Trojan War”.

The Trojan War began when a Trojan prince kidnapped the wife of a Greek king. The woman, Helen of Troy, became “the face that launched a thousand ships,” when her husband, Menelaus, assembled a fleet of ships to retrieve her from Troy. The war between the Greeks (who actually called themselves Achaeans) and the Trojans lasted ten years.

The Trojan War ended when the Greek commander Odysseus devised a plan to invade the walled city. The Greeks pretended to give up. Before leaving the Trojan beaches, they gave the Trojans a present—a giant wooden horse. The Trojans opened the gates to accept the horse. Inside the hollow horse were armed Greek troops, who sacked the city.

Although Homer does not mention it, there is debate whether or not Achilles and Patroclus had a homosexual relationship. It is also noticed that homosexuality was not mentioned in records before the Bronze Age Collapse and it became frequent with the gradual collapse of the Western Roman Empire about 476 AD and these two great events were certainly Turkic.

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