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Posts tagged ‘Tsardom of Russia’

Putin and the coming back of Rasputin


It makes sense that the Russian president Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin is from the Rurik dynasty, the Putyatin princes branch, from the Tver region, a clan of Russian princes. https://english.pravda.ru/history/1528-putin_genealogy/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rurik_dynasty

Grigori Yefimovich Rasputin 21 January 1869 – 30 December 1916) was a Russian holy man, a mystic, visionary, and prophet who befriended the family of Nicholas II, the last emperor of Russia, and gained considerable influence in late imperial Russia.

Rasputin was assassinated by a group encouraging the war against Germany which ended by overthrowing both national powers of the Tsardom of Russia of the House of Romanov and also of Emperor Wilhelm II, German Emperor of the German Empire. Destroying both Germany and Russia by fighting each other, and from within and installing Communism by plots of mercenaries in Germany and Russia at the same time.

Turkic Mongolian communists in Russia waged February Revolution of 1917. Then, they waged a similar war called German Revolution of 1918–1919 to create the Free Socialist Republic of Germany.

Rasputin continued to seek with the Russian Tsar to stay away from the conflict led to WWI, and in the summer of 1914 AD, Rasputin wrote a letter to Tsar Nicholas II in which he stated:

[Once again, I say: There is a terrible cloud over Russia. I see disaster, darkness, sadness … and no light. It is a sea of tears and blood .. What should I say ?! I can’t find words to describe that horror. They all want you to rush to war, but they don’t know that destruction awaits.

You are the Tsar, the father of this people. Do not let the madmen win and destroy you and destroy your people .. If we defeat Germany, what will happen to Russia? We will all be drowned in blood and the disaster will be great, and sorrow without end].

No doubt, the decision of Tsar Nicholas II of Russia to go into war against the German Empire on 30 July 1914 was the biggest disastrous mistake made in the 20 century that allowed the fall of nationalism all over the world and the rise of Capitalism, Zionism, Communism, Globalism, Atheism and Liberalism

“Rasputin” is a 1978 Euro disco hit single by the Germany-based pop and Euro disco group Boney M., the second from their album Night flight to Venus. It was written by the group’s creator Frank Farian, along with George Reyam and Fred Jay. It is a semi-biographical song about Grigori Rasputin, a friend and advisor of Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and his family during the early 20th century. The song describes Rasputin as a playboy, mystical healer, and political manipulator. They celebrate fooling Tsarist Russia, ridiculing Russians and destroying it. Notice “There was a cat that really was gone” in the lyrics which could mean cat-shaped spirit who lurked in wells or fountains and tempted youths to their deaths:

[Hey, hey, hey, hey, hey, hey, hey, hey

Hey, hey, hey, hey, hey, hey, hey, hey

Hey, hey, hey, hey, hey, hey, hey, hey

There lived a certain man in Russia long ago

He was big and strong, in his eyes a flaming glow

Most people looked at him with terror and with fear

But to Moscow chicks he was such a lovely dear

He could preach the Bible like a preacher

Full of ecstasy and fire

But he also was the kind of teacher

Women would desire

Ra ra Rasputin Lover of the Russian queen

There was a cat that really was gone

Ra ra Rasputin Russia’s greatest love machine

It was a shame how he carried on

He ruled the Russian land and never mind the Czar

But the kazachok he danced really wunderbar

In all affairs of state he was the man to please

But he was real great when he had a girl to squeeze

For the queen he was no wheeler dealer

Though she’d heard the things he’d done

She believed he was a holy healer

Who would heal her son

Ra ra Rasputin Lover of the Russian queen

There was a cat that really was gone

Ra ra Rasputin Russia’s greatest love machine

It was a shame how he carried on

But when his drinking and lusting

And his hunger for power

Became known to more and more people

The demands to do something

About this outrageous man

Became louder and louder

Hey, hey, hey, hey, hey, hey, hey, hey

Hey, hey, hey, hey, hey, hey, hey, hey

Hey, hey, hey, hey, hey, hey, hey, hey

Hey, hey, hey, hey, hey, hey, hey, hey

“This man’s just got to go”, declared his enemies

But the ladies begged, “Don’t you try to do it, please”

No doubt this Rasputin had lots of hidden charms

Though he was a brute, they just fell into his arms

Then one night some men of higher standing

Set a trap, they’re not to blame

“Come to visit us”, they kept demanding; And he really came

Ra ra Rasputin Lover of the Russian queen

They put some poison into his wine

Ra ra Rasputin Russia’s greatest love machine

He drank it all and said, “I feel fine”

Ra ra Rasputin Lover of the Russian queen

They didn’t quit, they wanted his head

Ra ra Rasputin Russia’s greatest love machine

And so they shot him ’til he was dead; Oh, those Russians]

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